Deep in the Art of DeWitt County

September 24 – October 16

Join us for Deep in the Art of DeWitt County, showcasing outstanding artists who have each called the DeWitt County area home. The exhibit will feature paintings and drawings by Kyle Polzin, Mark Kohler, Buck Schiwetz, Martha Sawyers, and Charles Schorre. The show, sponsored by the DeWitt County Historical Commission, celebrates DeWitt County’s 175th founding anniversary.

The assembled artworks span more than a century of award-winning artwork by five artists. The show includes works by three masters who lived and worked in the 20th century, through unprecedented times of change in the art world. Buck Schiwetz, Charles Schorre, and Martha Sawyers each staked a brave claim in commercial art before emerging as well-regarded artists on their own. Kyle Polzin and Mark Kohler, both contemporary painters, bring fresh vision in Western art and solid craftsmanship to their watercolors and canvases. Horses and riders, landscapes, still life studies, and portraits are vivid and timeless.

The scope of world view and life experience captured by these artists is inspiring. We hope you will stop by with your family and take in an extraordinary moment of local pride.

Buck Schiwetz, "April in DeWitt County"
Buck Schiwetz, "April in DeWitt County"
Charles Schorre, "Church/Barn Landscape"
Charles Schorre, "Church/Barn Landscape"
Martha Sawyers, "China Relief Poster"
Martha Sawyers, "China Relief Poster"
Kyle Polzin, "The Wrangler"
Kyle Polzin, "The Wrangler"
Mark Kohler, "Cloud Chaser"
Mark Kohler, "Cloud Chaser"

Ranching Heritage of the Guadalupe River Valley

As the centerpiece of the Museum, The Ranching Heritage of the Guadalupe River Valley exhibit gives visitors a walk through time and legend. The story of cattle ranching in the Guadalupe Valley, its roots in cattle ranching before and after the Great Cattle drives of the late 1800s, and the enduring folklore of the Texas cowboy is brought to life in this exhibit. Rich local history, including the infamous Sutton Taylor War, pitted cattle rustling outlaws against frontier justice and introduced lawmen such as the legendary Texas Rangers. Highly selective curation of objects for authenticity puts you that much closer to history.

Horsemen of the Americas: Tinker Collection

Dr. Edward Laroque Tinker’s collection of rare and horse-related artifacts from Mexico, Chile, Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and other Latin American countries is a priceless educational tool illustrating the expanse of cowboy and ranch life introduced to the New World by Spain in the 17th and 18th centuries. On permanent loan to the CTHM from the Harry Ransom Center (HRC) at The University of Texas at Austin, the Tinker Collection showcases the pride of craft shared by horsemen north and south of our borders in the golden age of working cattle on horseback. The exquisite workmanship of equestrian and ceremonial artifacts demonstrates an extraordinary level of artisanship.

Edward S. Curtis: A Portrait of Native American Life

A handsome series of photogravures of Native American subjects lines the hallway on CTHM’s second story. In the early 20th century, Edward S. Curtis captured Native American subjects – predominantly portraits but also landscapes, still lifes, scenes of everyday life, and more. In an article published in 1914, at the height of his fame, he wrote, “We want the documentary picture of the people and their homeland – a picture that will show the soul of the people.”

Spurs Showcase

CTHM is excited to announce a new exhibition of Texas spurs. The recently installed showcases are in our first floor lobby. Now a part of the Museum’s permanent collection, the exhibit features hand crafted spurs by Texas craftsmen Bianchi, Buermann, Crockett, Kelly Brothers, McChesney, Shipley and Alfred Smith, to name a few. Spur experts Bruce Bartlett and Kurt House, both from San Antonio, curated the collection.